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F.A.T.S. Knows!

News | February 20th, 2006



There are two main issues that students face when approaching Spring Break. Am I leaving and not returning next year, or am I leaving for the summer and coming back in the fall?

I'm leaving for good!
If you are permanently moving out, there are a couple of thing to know before you leave. If you are covered under the Tenant Protection Act (TPA), a tenancy of any type can only be brought to a close by giving your landlord written notice of your intent to leave. This notice must indicate the address in question, who the landlord is, the date that residence is to be terminated, and your signature. The amount of notice required depends on what kind of lease you have:

F.A.T.SA fixed term tenancy (e.g. 12 or 8 month) or a monthly tenancy (paying rent monthly)
These leases require at least 60 days written notice. Specify in the notice that it will be effective on the final day of the last month of tenancy. For example, give written notice before February 28 for a lease to end on April 30. You can't give notice in the middle of a lease to leave before the lease is finished.

A weekly tenancy (paying rent weekly)
These leases require at least 28 days written notice. Specify in the notice that it will be effective on the final day of the last week of tenancy.

What happens if I don't want to leave at the end of my lease?
If you stay at your place past your lease, you do not have to sign a new lease and you can go month-to-month indefinitely. You keep paying your rent, and you give the 60 days written notice when you intend to leave. If you gave a deposit, it's for the last month you actually live in the place, not for the last month on the lease.

NOTE: If you share a bathroom or a kitchen with the owner or the owner's immediate family, or if you are a tenant of a tenant, then the information above doesn't apply to you.

I'm coming back in the fall.
If you're leaving for the summer, but you plan to come back, you may want to save money by subletting your room for the summer. If you're covered under the Tenant Protection Act in your lease, you can sublet. The landlord has to approve your sublettor, and you are responsible for that person. You continue to pay your landlord your regular amount, and your sublettor pays you. You can not charge your sublettor more than you pay as rent. Also, be sure to fill out a subletting agreement, which is available outside the Counselling and Student Life Office (Room F2010).

If you'd like help preparing an agreement for subletters, want some tips on howto protect yourself from bad subletters or for information on any other housing issues, see the Housing Mediation Officer in Room F2010.

Office of the Registrar
We're working for you.


This column is a Student Success Initiative sponsored by Counselling and Student Life Services, Financial Aid and the Office of the Registrar.
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